Dividends: The Ultimate Second Income

Bored with the same old games, my 11-year old son and teenage daughter rummaged through the games closet and found an ancient relic, Monopoly. And as I excitedly told them about its history, that is was invented by self-described anti-monopolist, Elizabeth Magie, in 1903, that its purpose is to illustrate the hazards of concentrating land in private monopolies, my kids looked at me as if what they were hearing was, ‘blah, blah, blah’, rolled their eyes in tandem, and walked away.

Not an unexpected response. I mean, hey, the kids just want to be free to play, not weighed down by an adult (that would be me) spewing historical facts and economic theory. And play they did.

From time to time, they would ask me to clarify rules, which I was only too happy to oblige. Eventually, after surreptitiously spying on them from the kitchen, watching and listening as they learned rules and strategy, I came in from the cold and asked, ‘Can I play?’

Of course, being the adult whose headspace has not yet adjusted to the idea of summertime freedom, to the idea that summer is a time for letting it all go, for letting it all be, for being here, now, the Dad in the room (that would be me) had a hidden agenda.

And as I sat on the family room rug, took a seat at the playing board, and chose the Hat piece because the RaceCar was swiped by my son, I prepared to teach the kids a thing or two about the joy of property ownership.

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Interest and Dividends Rule

In other blog posts (see Property Investing: Need To Knows and Thinking About Investing In A Condo), I’ve discussed upsides, downsides, and things to be on the lookout for when buying real estate as an investment. And I also batted around the advantages of owning Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs). Whether we’re talking about owning REITs (i.e., stocks that pay monthly dividends) or real property (i.e., bricks and mortar buildings with tenants paying rent), the beauty of both is … they’re Income Generators.

I love Income Generators! What’s not to love? In essence, you’re paid for being the owner. An ‘income stream‘, is the somewhat poetic phrase describing the monthly cash flow that makes its way to your pocket.

While playing Monopoly, I tried explaining the concept to the 11-year old as he insisted on buying RailRoads (a kid with a fervent imagination, a romantic at heart, naturally he finds RailRoads captivating) instead of Marvin Gardens or Tennessee Avenue.

Listen, even if you own all four RailRoads, you collect only $200 each time someone lands on Pennsylvania or Reading or the others.

So.

So? You know how much rent you collect when someone lands on Tennessee and you’ve put up a hotel? $950!

I don’t care. Besides, I have way more money than you!

True, you do have more money. But I have more properties. And eventually, you’ll be paying that money to me for landing on my properties. Then Ill have the properties AND the money, and you’ll be left with bubkus.

I still want the RailRoads.

Ya well, kids see something special about trains and RailRoads. I get it. As for that particular game, it played out as expected, the kid coming up short. Same in the next game. But the third time around, the kid’s romantic heart took a back seat to his competitive nature. Taking a page from my playbook, the kid gave first priority to property accumulation, knowing that this was the eventual way to riches. At least in the game of monopoly.

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Knowing The Deal

Let me back up a moment. I’m not saying you’ll become wealthy if you own property. It may happen but it’s far from certain. But I am saying that property ownership is a truly excellent, outstanding way to generate income. That said, income is only one half of the equation. The other half being expenses.

When you own real property, like a condo (Thinking About Investing In A Condo), it’s absolutely essential to get a firm handle on expenses. Because if expenses outstrip income, then you have to revisit the question of … what’s the purpose of this investment?

If it’s not about generating net income, then it’s all about capital gain, i.e., expecting property value to increase before you sell the property. And if capital gain is the sole purpose, then you’ve ratcheted up risk level because you just don’t know what the property will be worth tomorrow or ten years from today.

Personally, I’m a big fan of REITs. And I’ll step outside my usual commentary and say that I prefer individual REITS over a REIT Index Fund. Why? Because while the REIT Index Fund typically offers less price volatility as compared to owning one or two or a handful of individual REITs, it will also pay a lower dividend, sometimes much lower.

So, I’m willing to trade off more volatility for more income. And I’ll do so knowing that REITs in general are not a volatile group like, say, technology stocks. And they usually do not see wild price swings.

Granted, you also won’t see price gains like you might in the technology sector. But I’m good with that. I’m good with owning stable REITs that offer relatively smaller price gains and a healthy dividend.

And I’m real good with watching the monthly dividend deposits to my account, knowing my total ownership expense is $9.99 for each purchase and sale.

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What Kind Of Income Are We Talking About

Let’s say you have a spare $100,000. And you want to invest in property. You could apply that 100k as a down payment toward a condo. Incur the costs of taking on a mortgage, monthly condo fees, legal fees, title fees, any property transfer tax. Then find a renter. And hope the renter is reliable, cares for your property, and minimizes your maintenance costs.

And maybe you would turn a profit each month. It just depends on the numbers involved. And you, being a BuddhaMoney enthusiast, would crunch, crunch, crunch all the numbers before making your purchase decision. I’m not trying to be a wet blanket here; these are just some of the realities of property ownership.

Or you could take that 100k and buy a few REITs. I lean toward REITs listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange because their dividend yields tend to be much more generous than those offered by companies with U.S. listings.

While there’s a whole bunch to choose from, I’ve listed a few below (though I want to emphasize that I’m not advising, telling, suggesting or otherwise whispering in your ear to go out and buy any of these REITs without first doing your research):

  • Pure Industrial REIT (TSE:AAR.UN). Pure Industrial’s portfolio concentrates on industrial properties located in both Canada and the U.S.A. It pays a yield of 4.65%.
  • Slate Office REIT (TSE:SOT.UN). Slate owns Canadian based commercial properties, with an emphasis on office buildings. It pays a yield of 9.65%.
  • RioCan REIT (TSE:REI.UN). RioCan is Canada’s largest REIT with a market cap near $8 Billion (CAD). It focuses on shopping centers, retail and mixed use properties. It pays a yield of 5.80%.
  • Dream Office REIT (TSE:D.UN). Dream owns a stable of office properties throughout major urban Canadian cities and pays a yield a whisker under 8%.

So for simplicity sake, let’s say on 100k the average yield for these four REITs is 7%. That’s $7,000/annually, less trading fees which would equal $9.95 x 4 = $39.80. And the bonus is that dividends are taxed at a lower rate than interest income (think rental income) meaning more money in your pocket.

Putting money to work for you. Generating an income stream. All helps toward building your wealth.