Ride Your Way To Wealth

Ride Demon (new name for my 11-year old son) recently bought a hoverboard. If you’re asking, ‘what’s a hoverboard’, well, know that you’re not alone. Because that was my immediate response when Ride Demon excitedly told me of his intended purchase. And my ignorance was cause for him to look at me as if I were from Mars. Or just really, really old and out of touch. I told him to go with the Mars theory.

Then Ride Demon proceeded to tell me all about hoverboards, starting with: they’re soooo much fun, move fast, and carving the streets on a board is awesome. It’s kind of like an electronic skateboard but wayyyyy more cool because they’re battery powered, come with Bluetooth speakers to play music while riding, and are controlled by body motion. Meaning, you lean slightly forward or backward to slow down or speed up, and steer right or left by placing more weight on one foot or the other.

After learning everything I always wanted to know about hoverboards, I asked Ride Demon about the cost (a few hundred dollars).

“I have it covered.”

“Oh?”

“I’m not asking you to pay.” (interpretation: it’s my money and I can do what I want).

“Okay.”

“I know it’s a lot but I’ve been saving my money for a long time and this is something I want.” (interpretation: I’d like to buy this without your opinions and analysis, Dad).

“Absolutely, your call.”

“And I’ve done all the research (the kid knows me; this would have been my next question), and this is the best board for the best price.”

“Totally trust you. Go for it.”

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Money Can’t Love Buy But It Can Buy Experience

So Ride Demon buys the board. And he’s having a blast. The added bonus is that a friend of his is into hoverboard riding as well. So the two boys venture out daily, doing their thing, no helicopter parents around to tell them to slow down or be careful.

Whether he’ll remain interested for a few days, weeks or months, who knows. And whether the expensive price tag was worth it, well, that’s a matter of judgment and perspective.

The way I see it, the kid is learning about money management. On his own, he reviews his bank balance, tally’s up the expense and consequent hit to his savings account, and makes the executive decision to forge onward with the purchase.

Sure, he gets a kick out of watching his balance grow. But, really, the three digit number only gives back so much in the excitement department. Ride Demon calculated that riding the board throughout the summer is worth a whole lot more than any squishy feeling he might get from hanging tight to money.

And I, the Dad in this equation, encourage the kid to jump through these mental hoops. To weigh the costs and benefits to any purchase. And when he makes a mistake, regrets a purchase, all the better. Because he’s learning, and what better time to learn than when you’re a kid, when life is generally free and easy (little does he know!), without financial responsibility, and no money mistake will end in any sort of enduring hardship.

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Self-Balancing

There’s another name for a hoverboard: self-balancing scooter. Yet, while the board does its best to facilitate balance, it won’t work unless you find your own center of gravity, bring your own balance to the board.

Ride Demon was a natural. He quickly learned how to stay upright and comfortably navigate. And as I watched him savoring one sweet ride after another, I’m thinking I’d like to try. So he lets me have a go at it. I step on, shake and wobble for a few seconds, then fall off. Again and again. It’s not as simple as it looks.

Neither is money management for many of us (you knew that, eventually, I was going to bring this around to more talk about money!). I mean, even when someone like Yours Truly passes on a wealth of knowledge (ahem), and you absorb that knowledge, decision making may nonetheless start from a place of discomfort (‘is this the right investment for me? Am I spending too much?) and end with a sense of uncertainty (‘I sure hope the investment works out because I really don’t want to lose money’; ‘it was fun going out for dinner four times this month but now I may not be able to pay off my credit card balance in full’).

So what do you do? Well, this is where I’m going to deliver one of those ‘sounds easy in theory but challenging to implement’ notions. You get comfortable with discomfort; you cozy up to uncertainty. You do your research, acquire information needed for wise decision-making, then make your call. And you do so with conviction knowing that the future is inherently uncertain. And if it works out, good! If not, that’s okay, you learn from it, adjust, and move forward. Not so different than life.

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Kid Rules

I love being around kids. We adults can learn so much from them. When Ride Demon falls down and scrapes his knee, bangs his elbow good, he doesn’t hesitate to get right back up, place himself in the proverbial saddle and get back to carving the streets. He seems to have an innate sense of balance, one that keeps it all in healthy perspective, one that doesn’t harshly self-judge, one that’s accepting, that exudes spirited enjoyment of life.

Now, all that said, the kid doesn’t have money issues and adult responsibilities. Okay, fair enough. But since you and I do, it’s even more important to find and embrace a healthy balanced perspective on money, and all other facets of life. Because it’s when we’re in balance that we’re healthy, wealthy, and just plain old feeling groovy about this gift of life.